Exhibitions & Events - 2016


The Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation is pleased to announce the release of Frank Stella Prints, A Catalogue Raisonné, by Richard H. Axsom, edited by Carolyn Vaughn, Sigrid Asmus, and Laura L. Morris, with a foreword by Jordan D. Schnitzer and text by Leah Kolb. The book is distributed by Artbook and D.A.P.

Frank Stella: Prints was published to coincide with Frank Stella Prints: A Retrospective - the first major exhibition of the artist's prints since 1982 - curated by Richard H. Axsom and currently on view at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art.

To celebrate the release of Frank Stella: PrintsPhillips will host a private book signing and panel discussion with Frank Stella, Jordan Schnitzer, Kenneth Tyler, and Richard Axsom at the preview party for their April 25th Editions Sale, which will be streaming live on the Phillips website on April 20th, 6-8pm.


SGCI CONFERENCE 2016 - FLUX: THE EDGE OF YESTERDAY AND TOMORROW

The printmaking community in Portland integrates tradition, innovation, and technology, while also promoting social awareness and sustainability. Our relationships with industry, community development, and social collaborations point to progress as we evolve with our environments and maintain relevance in the changing currents of contemporary society.

Printmakers and printmaking communities around the world are in flux. We are moving forward, adapting and responding to the changing times while honoring our rich history and foundations in printmaking.

JORDAN SCHNITZER - DISTINGUISHED ADVOCATE OF PRINTMAKING AWARD

It is with great pleasure that the SGC International Conference honors Jordan Schnitzer with the Distinguished Advocate of Printmaking Award. The 2016 SGCI Conference Steering Committee decided unanimously to give Jordan Schnitzer this award in recognition of his outstanding leadership and tireless efforts in supporting every aspect of printmaking in the Northwest region. Jordan’s vision and willingness to offer access to his collections for curators building exhibitions, for research and curricular activities within academic institutions, and for the promotion of scholarship around printmaking is transformative for the field. And Jordan’s continued support of printmaking initiatives and programs continues to have a tremendous impact on the printmaking community in the region. Printmaking could not have a more committed advocate and supporter. The field is better for it. And SGC International expresses the gratitude of printmakers, scholars, curators, and print lovers everywhere through this award. Learn more about the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation’s passion for sharing art. 


Lifetime Achievement Award Exhibition: James Rosenquist is co-presented with the Jordan D. Schnitzer Family Foundation and the Pacific Northwest College of Art MFA in Print Media program.  Featured at The 2016 SGC International Printmaking Conference, FLUX PORTLAND, the conference keynote on Thursday, March 31 at 9am will feature special guests special guests Maurice Sanchez of Derriere L’ Etoile Studio and James Reid of Gemini G.E.L. along with Jordan Schnitzer and Mack McFarland, Director of the Center for Contemporary Art & Culture who will discuss Rosenquist’s printmaking career.

Featured Panelists: 

  • Mack McFarland, Curator, Pacific Northwest College of Art
  • Jordan Schnitzer, President, Harsch Investment Properties & the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation
  • Maurice Sanchez, Professional Printer, Derriere L'Etoile Studios
  • James Reid, Master Printer, Gemini GEL

Pop Art icon James Rosenquist (born 1933 in Grand Forks, North Dakota) exploded onto the scene in 1960 with his vivid, large-scale paintings. Trained as a painter of billboard signs, Rosenquist abstracted familiar imagery from advertising and pop culture through alterations in scale and unusual juxtapositions. Although fragmented and overlapped, his images of spaghetti, Marilyn Monroe, hairdryers, and detergent boxes create understandable visual narratives of American culture, often with political implications.

Rosenquist contributed to the renewal of printmaking in the United States when in 1965 he and a number of other artists explored the process of lithography at Universal Limited Art Editions. Rosenquist also experimented with screen prints and etchings, but primarily produced lithographs. Over the years, Rosenquist worked with Graphicstudio, Aeropress, Gemini G.E.L., Petersburg Press, Styria Studios, Tyler Graphics, Ltd., and Derriere L’ Etoile Studio among others.

The work of James Rosenquist is represented in major private and public collections worldwide, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Tate Modern in London. Aside from his many gallery and museum exhibitions, Rosenquist has had more than fifteen retrospectives, with two at the Whitney Museum of American Art. In 2003, the Guggenheim Museum organized a retrospective that traveled to Houston, New York, Bilbao, and Wolfsburg. He received the Golden Plate Award from the American Academy of Achievement in 1988. Rosenquist has influenced an entire generation of artists and print makers.


PNCA’s 511 Gallery is pleased to welcome artist Wangechi Mutu to PNCA as part of the Jordan D. Schnitzer Exhibition and Visiting Artist Series.

Wangechi Mutu is a trained sculptor and studied anthropology but first came to prominence through her collage works, which fuse a diversity of sources culled from the image gluttony of late 20th century and early 21st century life. Mutu draws from the aesthetics of traditional ritual arts, science fiction, and Afrofuturistic funkdaleia. She makes use of materials from 19th century prints, fashion magazines, scientific periodicals, pornography, and ethnographic photographs to explore the contradictions of female and cultural identity and makes reference to colonial history, contemporary African politics, and the representation of female in media. She combines her sourced materials with ink, paint, and reflective material to realize lusciously intricate full figure works and portraiture. Since the late 1990’s Mutu’s artworks have been keenly focused on the creation of surrealist characters that are hauntingly grotesque and seductive while they critique systems of power and patriarchy, both political and aesthetic.


PNCA will celebrate the launch of the Jordan D. Schnitzer Exhibition and Visiting Artist Lecture Series with a reception honoring Jordan Schnitzer.

The Jordan D. Schnitzer Exhibition and Visiting Artist Lecture Series will present an annual curated exhibition from the dynamic and expansive collection of more than 9,000 contemporary prints of Jordan D. Schnitzer and the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation at the Pacific Northwest College of Art 511 Gallery. The series will bring an invited artist in connection to the exhibition to engage with PNCA students, faculty, and the public through lectures, studio visits, and collaborations with the MFA in Print Media program. In addition to the Exhibition and Visiting Artist Series, selections from the Collection will be lent to the PNCA Object Library to be studied by students and faculty on a regular rotating basis.

Wangechi Mutu: The Hybrid Human is the first exhibition in the series. 




Andy Warhol (1928-1987) depicted the world with the volume turned up. Employing a seemingly endless palette, his work has challenged our perceptions of popular culture, politics, and consumerism for more than fifty years. Warhol was the central figure of American Pop Art, a genre that emerged in the late 1950s in reaction to the heroism of Abstract Expressionism. For Pop artists, social and political turbulence coupled with unprecedented consumerism meant that art was no longer about the persona of the heroic individual artist, as it had been in the years immediately following World War II. Warhol and his contemporaries sought to eradicate the notion of the “genius artist” and downplay the role of originality in art, adopting mechanical means of generating images, such as screen-printing, which theoretically allowed for an endless production of images. In drawing inspiration from the rapidly changing world around them, Pop artists sought to be more inclusive in their subjects, and more aware of the day-to-day conditions of contemporary existence.

Spanning three decades of Warhol's career, In Living Color: Andy Warhol and Contemporary Printmaking features some of the artist's most iconic screen prints, including his portraits of Marilyn Monroe and Mao Zedong, the splashy camouflage series, and the controversial Electric Chair portfolio. Drawn exclusively from the rich collections of Jordan Schnitzer and his Family Foundation, In Living Color is divided into five sections-experimentation, emotion, experience, subversion, and attitude. In each, Warhol's work is placed in conversation with other artists of the postwar era who use color as a tool to shape how we interpret and respond to images.

Organized by the Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska




For over fifty years, Frank Stella has created a significant body of abstract art comprised of paintings, reliefs, sculptures, drawings, and prints. Frank Stella Prints: A Retrospective details the artist’s remarkable career as a printmaker. It presents, as evidence, over 100 prints that make apparent how his highly experimental endeavors have redefined the traditional print. The exhibition also offers a clear view of Stella’s stylistic evolution—a series of reinventions from the minimalist geometric abstraction of the early years to the baroque exuberance of the later gestural work.Frank Stella Prints: A Retrospective is the artist’s first major print retrospective since 1982. The exhibition is also the occasion for the publication of a revised and expanded second edition of The Prints of Frank Stella: A Catalogue Raisonné, 1967─1982 (New York: Hudson Hills Press, 1983).

Rick Axsom, Curator, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Stephen Fleischman, Director, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art.




Kara Walker is one of the most successful and widely known contemporary African American artists today; she is remarkable for her radical engagement with issues of race, gender, and sexuality and the media with which she pursues her studies. Though mainly celebrated for her provocative installations, composed of cut-paper silhouettes, Walker’s work in other media is equally strong and expands on the many powerful themes and questions of her practice. 

Walker’s selection of particular media is both aesthetic and conceptual. Often using outmoded technologies or old-fashioned techniques, she draws on the historical memory of her media, bringing her contemporary perspective into confrontation with the artifacts of history. Explaining the importance of historical representation for contemporary life, Walker explained, “One theme in my artwork is the idea that a Black subject in the present tense is a container for specific pathologies from the past and is continually growing and feeding off those maladies....” By looking carefully at a selection of Walker’s projects in different media, this exhibition will emphasize the interface between technique and concept in her work. Walker’s use of historically inflected techniques investigates the question: “How is contemporary identity shaped and affected by the imagery from the past?”

Kara Walker is both prolific and innovative. The projects presented in this exhibition will display the range of approaches she has taken to subject matter, historical narrative, artistic media and technique, and the complexities and ambiguities of racial and historical representation. By highlighting the obscure references and old-fashioned techniques of Walker’s artistic process, Emancipating the Past: Kara Walker’s Tales of Slavery and Power will illuminate the rigorously researched underpinnings of Walker’s work with the aim to make her provocative approach accessible to a diverse audience.

This retrospective of prints, featuring works from the series Emancipation and Harper’s Pictorial History of the Civil War, as well as selected other prints, videos and a wall silhouette, is organized by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon, Eugene, from the Portland, Oregon-based collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer.

The exhibition was curated by Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art Jessi DiTIllio, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon from the Portland, Oregon-based collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation.




This exhibition will showcase the prints of contemporary icon Richard Serra. Best known for his large scale public sculpture, Serra has consistently maintained a practice in related media including film, drawing, and printmaking. The exhibition features his earliest graphic attempts in lithography from 1972 through more recent works created in 2015.


Wangechi Mutu is a trained sculptor and studied anthropology but first came to prominence through her collage works, which fuse a diversity of sources culled from the image gluttony of late 20th century and early 21st century life. Mutu draws from the aesthetics of traditional ritual arts, science fiction, and Afrofuturistic funkdaleia. She makes use of materials from 19th century prints, fashion magazines, scientific periodicals, pornography, and ethnographic photographs to explore the contradictions of female and cultural identity and makes reference to colonial history, contemporary African politics, and the representation of female in media. She combines her sourced materials with ink, paint, and reflective material to realize lusciously intricate full figure works and portraiture. Since the late 1990’s Mutu’s artworks have been keenly focused on the creation of surrealist characters that are hauntingly grotesque and seductive while they critique systems of power and patriarchy, both political and aesthetic.

The Hybrid Human brings together several pieces, including complete sets of two series the Histology of the Different Classes of Uterine Tumors from 2006, and The Original Nine Daughters from 2012.